Teaching

New: ES470 will soon be accepting applications! Check here for details: https://natalieban.wordpress.com/es470/

Natalie teaches the following courses:

  • ES 321: Introduction to Ethnoecology
  • ES 470: Community and regional coastal-marine conservation
  • ES 481/581: Advanced topics in ethnoecology: Analyzing environmental issues using a social-ecological systems perspective
  • ES 500/600: Perspectives on Environmental Theory, Methods and Skills I
  • ES 501/601: Perspectives on Environmental Theory, Methods and Skills II

ES 321: Introduction to Ethnoecology. This course examines different aspects of local and traditional ecological knowledge systems, and investigate similarities and differences between these systems and those of western academic knowledge. Students learn about the connections between social and ecological systems. Beliefs regarding the relationship between humans and the environment as expressed in both Western science and the traditions of Indigenous peoples, where these knowledge systems intersect and diverge, are examined. (Taught summer 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016)

ES 481/581: Advanced topics in ethnoecology: Analyzing environmental issues using a social-ecological systems perspective. Environmental problems are multi-faceted issues, involving complex interactions between people and the environment. Analyzing environmental issues to formulate options for solutions thus requires interdisciplinary approaches. The concept of social-ecological systems is one such approach that is gaining recognition internationally. This class uses a social-ecological systems lens to better understand, analyze, and find solutions to environmental issues. Through the assignments in this class, students learn about and contribute to ongoing research on social-ecological systems. Students work in groups to carry out in-depth case study research. Each group will focus on one case study to understand the environment (resources), actors (stakeholders), and governance system in the case, and how these interact with one another. (Taught Fall 2013, Fall 2014)

ES 500/600: Perspectives on Environmental Theory, Methods and Skills I. A required course for incoming graduate students, this course provides students with skills and ways of approaching advanced interdisciplinary research. It provides a collective and critical conversation about the theory and practice of, and wider contexts for, research in environmental studies. The course includes a combination of seminar-style discussions of classic and innovative environmental studies literature and more informal conversations covering issues of practical concern. (Taught Fall 2014, Fall 2015)

ES 501/601: Perspectives on Environmental Theory, Methods and Skills II. A required course for incoming graduate students, this course explores the methods and methodologies that characterize each of the graduate students’ research areas. Weekly seminar topics and required readings will be selected based on students’ interests and needs. Throughout the term we discuss approaches, skills, and habits that are fundamental to good scholarship.  Classes consist of seminars, discussions, short skills labs, and a weekend retreat. (Spring 2016)

ES 470: Community and regional coastal-marine conservation. This 5-day intensive field course aboard the schooner Passing Cloud (www.outershores.ca) will give students first-hand experience of the issues facing coastal and marine conservation at a community and regional scale. Course activities will include meetings with stakeholders, presentations, discussions, and projects. Additional fee: $1400. This field course has an application process for students. The field portion takes place during the Fall break, 2016 (Nov. 9-13). There will also be a few meetings before and after the field-intensive part of the course. A course project will be due at the end of the semester. Check here for details and how to apply: https://natalieban.wordpress.com/es470/

Passing Cloud at the dock eagerly awaiting her next adventure

Passing Cloud anchored in the Great Bear Rainforest

Students enjoying dinner aboard the Passing Cloud

 

Only 12 spaces available!

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